First TeachNow Lesson Plan

 

Lesson Plan

 

Teacher Candidate:   Nichole Lee Stinemetz

Lesson Title: Introducing Point of View and Reading with Silly Voices

Grade Level and Course: 2nd Grade (ELL only)

Time Segment of Lesson: 50 minutes

 

Standard(s) Addressed in Lesson:  

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.6: Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud.

 

Objective(s) of the Lesson:  Students will be able to …

 

  • I can recognize first, second, and third person point of view, and I can use evidence such as what pronoun is being used to support my argument.

  • I can recognize when different characters are talking by using different voices when reading aloud.

  • I can recognize what character is talking when his/her comments are in quotes.

 

Student Diversity and Differentiation of Instruction

 

Student Diversity Differentiation of Instruction
Emergent ELL Student I will make sure the emergent ELL learner highlights his/her pronouns first. The student will be provided with a list of pronouns and the point of view for visual reference. This should help the student complete the worksheet which is a formative assessment. During reading, I will make sure that students highlight the spoken portions reinforcing the idea of quotation marks. Students will read in their table groups to help prevent the emergent ELL from being embarrassed about his/her pronunciation. When asking the student to answer discussion questions, I should make sure to rephrase with easier vocabulary but still with target keywords. Working in a group with a patient but strong student during discussion will also help this student.
Advanced Student I have a couple of these students. If I notice that they complete the project early, I will allow them to pick a book from the library to read while other students finish. Or they are given the option of traveling and helping a student at another table. During discussion time, the students will be asked questions from the advanced question list.

 

Formative and Summative Assessments- include open ended questions that will lead students to think deeply about the content and will also build on prior knowledge.

 

Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
  • The summative assessment is an end of project first person narrative written from a villain’s point of view. It’s about five lessons in.

  • There’s also a cumulative exam at the end of March which will ask students to identify points of view.

 

Questions for formative assessment during and/or after the lesson

 

  1. What point of view is this passage?

 

  1. What are the types of point of view?

 

  1. Do you think the emotion would change if this was written from Red Riding Hood’s point of view?

 

  1. What pronoun do you see? Because you see this pronoun, what point of view do you think it is? (Remedial Question)

 

  1. Can you find quotation marks? Who is talking?

    6. How do you know when a character is talking?

    7. Do you think point of view changes the emotion of the book? If so, how? (Advanced Question)

 

  1. Do you think the emotion would change if this written from the Big Bad Wolf’s point of view? How? (Advanced Question)

 

  1. How does Red Riding Hood’s background affect how she thinks about the big bad wolf? (Advanced Question)

 

  1. Why might it be important to understand the Big Bad Wolf’s point of view? (Advanced Question).

 

Big Ideas to be Addressed in the Lesson:

 

  1. The goal of lesson 1 is to double check that crucial key vocabulary has been mastered.
  2. Students will be able to identify the different points of view and how these different points of view change and impact how a story is told.
  3. The students will also recognize the importance of understanding all point of views not just one character’s point of view

 

Discussion Questions

Write out questions that you would like students to discuss in class, before class or after class because they are interesting, support higher order thinking, and make for a lively and engaging discussion. If discussions must happen outside class, what tool will you use to facilitate the discussion (e.g. Twitter)?

 

If needed outside of class, I’d like to use voicethread. Because typing is really hard for my students.

 

  1. What point of view is this passage?

 

  1. What are the types of point of view?

 

  1. Do you think the emotion would change if this was written from Red Riding Hood’s point of view?

 

  1. What pronoun do you see? Because you see this pronoun, what point of view do you think it is? (Remedial Question)

 

  1. Can you find quotation marks? Who is talking?

    6. How do you know when a character is talking?

    7. Do you think point of view changes the emotion of the book? If so, how? (Advanced Question)

 

  1. Do you think the emotion would change if this written from the Big Bad Wolf’s point of view? How? (Advanced Question)

 

  1. How does Red Riding Hood’s background affect how she thinks about the big bad wolf? (Advanced Question)

 

  1. Why might it be important to understand the Big Bad Wolf’s point of view? (Advanced Question).

 

21st Century Knowledge and Skills

 

21st Century Knowledge and Skills Teaching Strategies
Critical thinking: The discussion questions promote critical thinking. We’re working on developing understanding of a character’s motives.
Cooperation: Students will work in groups to complete the magnet game, they will also work in groups to answer advanced discussion questions.
Empathy:The students will work on understanding how the story can be the same, but characters might feel different ways and what words indicate that.  This should also help my student relate better as a class later on since we are working on developing empathy for others.

Teaching Strategies and Related Student Activities (Include Web 2.0 activities and innovative strategies,as appropriate):

 

The goal of lesson 1 is to double check that crucial key vocabulary has been mastered.

  1. First, we will discuss what point of view is and the three types of points of view (10 minutes).  
  • We will do this by reviewing key point of view vocabulary such as: pronouns, “I”, “you”, “he”, “she”, “they”, quotation marks, first person, second person, and third person
  • Identifying third person limited versus third person omniscient is a fairly advanced skill and will be skipped for the purposes of this unit unless the student is accelerated.
  • Then, I will write short example sentences (using the students names), and we will work together to identify points of view quickly.
    • This activity will be done with magnets
    • To further explain, I might write a sentence like, “Shelly ate 5,000 bananas last Wednesday.” The students then would work as group to pick their point of view card in this case third person and walk quickly up and slam their vote on the whiteboard.
    • I will increase the difficulty of the example sentences and include a short small paragraph at the very end such as: I was getting ready to ask Ms. Nichole a question, when I heard a crash. “Nick,” I yelled, “are you alright?”. She had fallen out of her chair, but she gave me a cheerful thumbs up before looking at the board.
      • This is a more difficult sentence because the students have to remember that the I outside of quotation marks makes this a first person passage.

 

  1. Then, we will complete this pre-assessment. I will guide them through the first problem.  
  • Different Passages Point of View (20 Minutes)
  • I would first begin with a pre-assessment using the link located below. This should take about 20 minutes. This activity shows the reader several passages and asks them to identify whether its first person, second person, or third person. This lets me know who remembers the information from the unit in September, and who doesn’t.
  • We would then go through as a class and highlight the pronouns to show how the pronouns let us know what point of view the passage is in. If the students struggle a lot with this, I will know to go back over the key terms extensively for one of the lessons.
  • This also is the first chance for me to link explaining how we know the point of view to pronouns and names while reading text.
  • Worksheet being used: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Point-of-View-Assessment-Common-Core-Standard-RL6-636457
  • I could also use a kahoot quiz instead of the worksheet
  • If the majority of students struggle with this assessment, the lesson plan will be adjusted to include first mastering identifying points of view. The three objectives listed here must be partially met before advancing to the next objective.
  • Possible changes to future lessons would include having a remedial lesson and having 10 minute learning checks involving quick point of view identification.
  1. Reading Passages in Different Points of View
  • Students would read “Little Red Riding Hood”, and I would make sure to point out various areas where the tone changes and including highlighting the quotation marks.
  • We will work on using various silly but different voices, and I will check through discussion whether the students appear to understand that different characters are speaking and can use the text to prove that that character is speaking.
  • The students will also explore the emotions behind each character’s voice.
  • If the students are struggling to identify when a character is speaking, I would make that students understand how quotation marks work. And I would ask to give a quotation remedial lesson during either literature time or grammar time.
  • Discussion will be held during this time.
  • If time, advanced discussion questions will be done in groups at the table.

 

Teacher/Student Input: Write a note on what you expect the teacher and students to do as a part of this activity. Include a note on whether this is an “I do it”, “We do it” or “You do it” type of activity.

  • I can explain the points of view.
  • We can recognize points of view when given one to four sentences of a passage.
  • You all can work together to figure out the point of view when given one to four sentences of a passage.
  • You can highlight pronouns and recognize on the worksheet the different points of view.
  • You can recognize the different points of view and explain how you know that it’s that point of view.
  • We can talk about how points of view affect the tone of a passage.
  • We can use different voices for the characters of a passage.
  • We can recognize and highlight when a character is speaking using the highlighter and looking for quotation marks.

 

***This is an introductory lesson, so most of this is “We can” instruction.

 

Review: Write down ideas on how you will review the topic, including notes on types of formative assessments that you will use during the lesson.

  • While reading different books, we will now ask every time what point of view the book is written in.
  • This worksheet is used to determine whether I need to focus on identifying points of view https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Point-of-View-Assessment-Common-Core-Standard-RL6-636457
  • If recognizing the point of view easily, we will include bonus questions during review whiteboard/Jeapordy games reviewing this topic
  • Character’s feelings while talking will continually be evaluated during discussion during the rest of the unit extensively and into the next unit during discussion if students are still struggling.
  • Students will continue to work on identifying and speaking in different voices when dialogue is present.
  • Students will continue highlighting when a character is talking during literature booklets.

 

Materials and Resources for Lesson

 

Materials Technology and Websites
Worksheet: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Point-of-View-Assessment-Common-Core-Standard-RL6-636457

Magnets:

Point of view magnets

Reading Booklet:

https://www.readinga-z.com/books/leveled-books/book/?id=2531&lang=English

Pencils

Highlighters

Erasers

Pre-printed out Simple Point of View Sentences for the first portion of the activity

Pronoun and Point of View Reference Sheet

Computers if using Kahoot

 

References

Barden. A. (2013). Point of View Assessment – Common Core Standard RL6.TeachersPayTeachers.https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Point-of-View-Assessment-Common-Core-Standard-RL6-636457

Murphy, M. (n.d.). Examining Point of View. BetterLessonPlans. Retrieved from https://betterlesson.com/lesson/595410/examining-point-of-view

Reading Worksheets. (n.d.) [PDF document]. Retrieved May 22 from https://www.ereadingworksheets.com/point-of-view-worksheets/point-of-view-comic-strips-project.pdf

Notes about Student Development Standard:

This lesson has a focus like most lessons on the student development standard. My students are a very young age, and they work very hard.

However, they are still only between the ages of 6-10. So, the use of silly voices, and the exploring of inferential concepts through a well known story are suited to the age level in my opinion. I want them to think deeply, but I think it’s important that it come with some silliness.

To enhance their development as human beings, I really want to make sure that they develop empathy through others. By exploring the literature standard for points of view, I want to subtly reinforce the idea that people’s viewpoints differ based on where they’re coming from. So, that my students can apply this to their daily lives.

I also think I would like to add a point of view rhyme or song of  some sort. But I’m still looking for a good one. Songs and movement are really great for this age level in my opinion.

And I want most of the my assessments to involve some sort of movement.

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